Michele’s Story – The Early Process of Training a Psychiatric Service Dog

img_2899Meet Michele, she is a retired music teacher. Michele suffers from bi-polar disorder which has made it difficult for Michele to work her job at Walmart and to socialize outside of her home. Michele has attended therapy and has taken medications for bi-polar disorder.

Medication has been a difficult road for Michele. The medication is not always effective and some of the side effects have interfered with Michele’s quality of life. In an effort to find a solution, Michele took to the internet where she found Healing Companions, Inc.

After going through the screening process, Michele was introduced to Max, a dog whom she hopes one day will be her psychiatric service dog (PSD). When Max was 2 months old he was surrendered to an animal shelter. Max was rough around the edges and his fate could have been dire until he was given the opportunity to train to be more adoptable.

At 9 months old Max was taken to a correctional facility where he participated in a program that matches inmates with rescue dogs in the hope of training them to be adoptable or to potentially become a PSD. The inmates, who are taught by Jane of Healing Companions, learn the Blue Buffalo dog food tips, as well as the skill of basic dog training and benefit from the opportunity of experiencing the emotional benefits of spending time with man’s best friend.

At 11 months, Max was introduced to Michele. Although Max is still “puppish” he is already showing signs that he can be trained to be Michele’s PSD. In order to become Michele’s PSD, Max and Michele will participate in weekly training sessions with Healing Companions to teach Max the specific tasks that will assist Michele in dealing with bi-polar disorder.

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Currently, Michele and Max are in the midst of the bonding process and although not specifically trained yet, Max is showing behaviors that demonstrate that he is trainable to become a PSD. Max is “sweet, kind and gentle” and is sensitive to Michele’s moods. Michele admits that due to her disorder her moods are uneven. Because Max reacts to Michele’s mood changes, she has become more conscious of her own mood as to not “upset” Max. So in that sense, Max is teaching Michele to self-regulate her moods. Michele explained that Max, being half Great Dane and half Labrador retriever and being large in size is a benefit to her. Max helps her to feel safe.

IMG_2893This relationship is not a one way street. Michele loves Max and takes good care of him. She has learned that Max is a runner so she now enjoys bringing him to the dog park for exercise and socialization. And guess what? Michele is enjoying these trips with Max and is learning to make friends with the other dog owners.

Although Michele and Max are just getting to know one another, the bond they share has already made a positive difference in Michele’s life. With further training, Max will learn tasks to assist Michele with everyday life such as retrieving her medication and forming a barrier between Michele and someone who is making her anxious.

Moving forward Michele states that she would like to be an advocate for PSDs. Michele wants the world to know that shelter dogs, just like Max, are worthy of love and have so much to give. She believes the key to her recovery is to educate others with mental illness and to aid them in learning about how PSDs can make a real difference in their lives. Go to the bluebuffalo.com k9 rewards page for more information.

MICHELLE MEETS MAX

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Learning with Purpose: Inmate Values Opportunity to Train Psychiatric Service Dogs

Healing Companions, a 501 (c)(3) organization, serves mentally ill residents of Northeast Ohio and changes the lives of shelter dogs – adopted and trained to become Psychiatric Service Dogs (PSDs), persons experiencing a mental disorder – providing them with a PSD, and inmates – who train the dogs and gain job skills and “soft skills” to help them obtain employment and contribute to the community upon release.

In this clip, an inmate talks about a recent visit with one of the people who received a PSD. He was greatly moved by her story as she shared her experiences living with mental illness and how her life has changed now that she has a service dog. He now has a better appreciation of how the Healing Companions program changes lives and is grateful for the experience he is able to have in helping with the dogs’ basic training.

Won’t you consider supporting Healing Companions to help us continue the work we do?

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Training Psychiatric Service Dogs: Inmate Reflects on Lessons Learned

Healing Companions, a 501 (c)(3) organization, serves mentally ill residents of Northeast Ohio and changes the lives of shelter dogs – adopted and trained to become Psychiatric Service Dogs (PSDs), persons experiencing a mental disorder – providing them with a PSD, and inmates – who train the dogs and gain job skills and “soft skills” to help them obtain employment and contribute to the community upon release.

In this clip, you’ll hear from an inmate who trains shelter dogs their basic skills to be more adoptable and when qualified placed in our program to be trained their public access and task training as PSDs. He shares how the lessons learned to help the dogs have also helped him better manage his own symptoms of bi-polar depression.

Won’t you consider supporting Healing Companions to help us continue the work we do?

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A New Path: Key Role of Inmates in Training Psychiatric Service Dogs

Healing Companions, a 501 (c)(3) organization, serves mentally ill residents of Northeast Ohio and changes the lives of shelter dogs – adopted and trained to become Psychiatric Service Dogs (PSDs), persons experiencing a mental disorder – providing them with a PSD, and inmates – who train the dogs their basic skills to be more adoptable and when qualified placed as psychiatric service dogs in training while the inmates gain job skills and “soft skills” to help them obtain employment and contribute to the community upon release.
In this clip, you’ll hear from an inmate who trains the shelter dogs their basic skills — helping them to become more adoptable by addressing behavior issues and qualifying them to become trained as PSDs. Since becoming part of the Healing Companions training program, he has discovered a passion for training dogs. He now wants to become a dog trainer and behavior consultant. We are helping him and other inmates interested in this path by inviting presenters to educate them about their business options once they re-enter the workforce.

Won’t you consider supporting Healing Companions to help us continue the work we do?

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Psychiatric Service Dogs: Saving Dogs and Changing Lives

Healing Companions is a 501(c)(3) organization, serving mentally ill residents of Northeast Ohio. Through a dedicated approach to community mental health, a three-fold benefit emerges: a shelter dog is saved and trained as a psychiatric service dog (PSD) to provide assistance to a person experiencing a mental disorder.

This person benefits from a higher level of functioning and participation in society, with help from their dog. Shelter dogs are trained basic skills by inmates, who in turn gain job skills and “soft skills” to help them obtain jobs and contribute to the community upon release. These services go a long way to saving the lives of dogs and humans alike, as well as keeping them a part of the world and the community.

Won’t you consider supporting Healing Companions to help us continue the work we do?

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